Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Gustavo Lacerda ~ Albino


Gustavo Lacerda, Thyfany II, 2009

There is an amazing photographic exhibition currently on view at the Catherine Edelman Gallery in River North. “Albino” is a series of classic photographic portraits by Brazilian artist, Gustavo Lacerda. The work captures the segment of the population born melanin defect, resulting in the loss of pigment in the skin, hair and eyes.

Lacerdo presents his subjects in front of soft muted backgrounds, which emphasize the subtle pigments of the figures. He explores the beauty of innocent children [being children] to the not so typical, single and group portraits. The Victorian inspired “Thyfany II” [2009] and the playful “Livia” [2009] are standouts.


Gustavo Lacerda, Livia, 2009

The exhibition continues through January 4th. The Catherine Edelman Gallery is located at 300 W. Superior Street in Chicago. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10-5:30. Additional information can be found on the Catherine Edelman Gallery web site at: edelmangallery.com

Gustavo Lacerda works and lives Sao Paulo. His series, Albinos, has received critical praise and was recently featured on Huffington Post and Wonderland Magazine and is included in the Musée du Quai Branly Collection (Paris, France) and the Sao Paulo Museum of Art (Sao Paulo, Brazil). A monograph on Albinos is in production, and will be released at the end of 2013 by Editora Estudio Madalena.

Saturday, November 23, 2013

Toshiko Takaezu ~ Perimeter Gallery


Toshiko Takaezu, “Form C”, 2001, ceramic, 32 x 20 x 19 inches

Yesterday afternoon, I spent some time wandering around Chicago’s River North gallery district. It's been a month or two since I had an opportunity to visit the neighborhood so I’ve been anticipating this time to explore. The trip was well worth it… I saw some wonderful work.


Perimeter Gallery, located at 210 W. Superior Street, is presenting a beautifully-peaceful exhibition of ceramic vessels by Toshiko Takaezu (1922-2011). The gallery becomes a garden of vessels mimicking a walk through a forest or nature preserve. The vertical vessels emerge from the floor as though growing from the hardwood. Smaller pieces—resting on platform ledges—offer a vision of vines cascading from a garden wall. The clean form of the vessels mimic the crisp environment of the gallery while the beautifully adorned surfaces add a natural element of intrigue with brushstrokes and drips of neutral tones… peaceful and meditative. 

Also, don’t forget to visit Perimeter's lower level gallery. There is a wonderful—very meditative— installation piece by Keiko Hara that should be experienced.

The Toshiko Takaezu exhibition continues through December 31st. Perimeter Gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10:30 to 5:30. Additional information can be found at: perimetergallery.com
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Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Frances A. Cox ~ Still Life Portraits

Frances A. Cox, Conversation, oil on canvas, 24" x 28"

Save the Date: Friday, December 13th 5-7pm

Last week, I received an email from Frances Cox inviting me to her Rogers Park studio. The invitation was an offer to preview a series of paintings that she created for an upcoming exhibition. I accepted.

The solo exhibition—titled “Still Life Portraits”—will be presented at the Renaissance Court Gallery of the Chicago Cultural Center from December 13th through January 26th, 2014. The Opening Reception is scheduled for Friday, December 13th from 5-7pm. You should plan to attend. This is a “must see” exhibition.

Cox—a prolific painter—utilizes plant forms as metaphor for human emotions. She opening points out…
“When I look at plant forms, I view them as botanical singularities having the characteristics of other living things.”
Her ornate images guide the viewer on a journey through the picture plane—exploring gestural botanical forms and structures alluding to humanity. The images are sometimes a singular “figure” while others define relationships.

The most current images are brilliant. Cox has pushed her color palette to explore stronger contrasts—making the images pop off the surface of the canvas. The glistening oil shimmers with fluid emotion created through a combination of silhouette and beautifully modeled forms. The mixture of modulation lends to the complexity of the elaborate compositions.

Frances A. Cox, Two Eccentric Vases II, oil on canvas, 28" x 34"

Join me at the opening reception of Still Life Portraits on Friday, December 13th from 5-7pm. The Renaissance Court Gallery is on the first floor of the Chicago Cultural Center, located at 78 East Washington Street in Chicago.

Gallery Hours: Monday through Thursday; 9am–7pm, Friday; 9am–6pm, Saturday; 9am–6pm, and Sunday; 10am–6pm

Frances A. Cox, White Vase with Hanging Pear, oil on canvas, 28" x 30"

Frances A. Cox was raised in Chicago, IL, graduated from Marquette University and attended the Art Institute of Chicago. Her work has been exhibited in many state group shows as well as regional juried exhibitions across the Midwest and has earned numerous awards from Midwest Museums of Art.

​Solo Exhibitions of her work have been held at the Freeport Museum of Art in Freeport, Illinois as well as the South Bend Museum of Art in South Bend, Indiana.
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Sunday, November 17, 2013

Meditative Surfaces ~ ArtScene ~ Fort Wayne Museum of Art



I spent this past Friday night with Maggie Meiners and Deanna Krueger, at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, speaking about our Meditative Surfaces exhibition currently on display in the museum's Regional Artists Gallery. The exhibition space is pristine yet approachable and the  presentation of the work is beautifully curated. About twenty local art enthusiasts attended the lecture—wanting to learn more about the show's genesis as well as our individual artistic journeys.


Meditative Surfaces continues through January 19th at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art. The Museum is located at 311 E. Main Street in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Museum hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10-6, Thursday 10-8, and Sunday 12-5. Admission is free to members, $7 for adults, $5 for students and seniors 65 and over. The museum offers free general admission every Thursday from 5-8 and Sunday. Learn more at: fwmoa.org


Friday, November 8, 2013

Jane Fulton Alt: The Burn Book Release



Last night, I attended the book signing reception for The Burn, a newly published book presenting the work of award-winning photographer, Jane Fulton Alt. The event took place at the DePaul Art Museum and was hosted—in part—by the Ragdale Foundation. The DePaul Art Museum is relatively new to the city—it opened in the autumn of 2011. Located on Fullerton Avenue in Lincoln Park, the museum is easily accessible by public transportation [CTA brown and red line trains] and street parking was abundant. If you have the opportunity, take the time to experience this venue.

To give a little background... The Burn series of photographs are a mystical journey into the place between life, death and rebirth. The images depict the beauty, violence and regenerative power of controlled prairie burns. Alt first experienced a prairie burn during an artist residency at Ragdale in 2007. Since then, she has documented the Lake Forest prairie burns each spring and fall.

Last night's book signing event was beautifully choreographed. When we arrived, we were confronted with a larger-than-life video presentation of a prairie burn. The images flickered across a large wall and the crackle and snapping of burning wood was heard in surround sound. The numerous people in the room, sipping wine and conversing, created a surreal experience... As though we were attending a cocktail party in the burning wilderness.

The evening paused to include a presentation by Alt, defining her journey as a photographer. Clearly inspired by the mysteries of life and death, Alt began her talk by presenting a projected image of a face emerging from a pool of water. She pointed out that the image represented both the emergence of life—the first breath, as well as the cold, lifelessness of a death mask.

Alt's journey has taken her from photographing the birth of children to the last days of hospice patients... slaughterhouses and autopsies... exploring the holy cremation site of Varanasi and the Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico. She has even photographed the result of Hurricane Katrina. But each of her images seems to include an element of hope and rebirth.

If you missed last night's event, Jane Fulton Alt will be speaking in Evanston, Illinois at Perspectives Gallery on Sunday, January 12th at 4:30 pm. If you have an opportunity, try to attend. You won't be disappointed. Jane Fulton Alt is multifaceted, has a powerful story and is an amazing public speaker. December Book Release / Speaking Engagements include venues in San Francisco and New Orleans. Additional information can be found at janefultonalt.com


Tuesday, November 5, 2013

North Central College visits Breaking Criminal Traditions at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law



Last Tuesday morning, North Central College Gallery Director, Nickole Lanham-Murray lead a small delegation of students from the Naperville campus to the Breaking Criminal Traditions exhibition at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law. Executive Producer; Cheryl Jefferson, Co-Producer/Exhibiting Artist; Richard Laurent, and myself, met the group to walk them through the exhibit, answer questions about the included artists, and the criminal traditions that the work was selected to represent.

The exhibition calls attention to ongoing ancient rituals that kill or maim millions each year—yet aren’t considered crimes. It is a visual exploration of human rights designed to begin a dialogue and raise consciousness, which is the first step toward preventing the continuation of these horrifying acts. In the past few weeks—since Breaking Criminal Traditions has opened—it seems to be doing just that.

The enthusiastic group spent more than a couple of hours exploring the show. Jefferson and Laurent offered stories of the criminal traditions as the group moved through the exhibition space. At times, it was obvious that the viewers were touched with emotion.

The exhibition includes work by:  James Deeb, Sheila Ganch, Andrea Harris, Paula Kloczkowski Luberda, Richard Laurent, Zoriah Miller, Nancy Rosen, Lorraine Sack, Valerie Schiff, Barbara Simcoe, and Anne Smith Stephan.


The Art of influence: Breaking Criminal Traditions will be on display through February 3. The gallery is located on the 3rd floor of the IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, located at 565 West Adams Street in Chicago [the corner of Adams and Jefferson]. Street Parking is abundant.

The gallery is open Monday-Thursday 7:30am-11pm, Friday 7:30am-9:30pm, and Saturday 8:30am- 6pm. Most of the pieces included in the exhibition are available for purchase. Additional information—and upcoming events—can be found at BreakingCriminalTraditions.com.
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Sunday, October 27, 2013

Lorraine Sack ~ Breaking Criminal Traditions on WBEZ


Lorraine Sack, Figure with Magenta Background, Oil on Linen, 56 x 32"

Friday afternoon, WBEZ's Worldview, aired an interview on Weekend Passport with Cheryl Jefferson, Executive Producer of The Art of Influence... Breaking Criminal Traditions. The interview focused on the genesis of the exhibition and the show's intent to raise awareness of the ongoing ancient rituals that kill or maim millions each year—yet aren’t considered crimes.

During the interview, Jefferson spoke of the amazing figurative paintings created by Indianapolis artist, Lorraine Sack. Her beautiful, classical representations of the human form are draped or veiled in two of the three works. Jefferson explains that the paintings allude to the issues surrounding women who choose to veil.

The third of Sack's paintings—shown at the onset of this blog post—Figure with Magenta Background, was selected for the exhibition, not as a representation of veiling, but as a symbol of empowerment. The subject is a powerful women, confronting the viewer. She's comfortable in her skin—wearing nothing but an extravagant bracelet. The vibrant red walls and the matching ottoman on which she sits, add to the power of the image. The warmth of the surrounding color reflects on to the mocha skin-tones of the subject. She is an expression of power and self-assured elegance.

Jefferson's Weekend Passport interview can be heard on WBEZ's Worldview. The Art of influence: Breaking Criminal Traditions is on display through February 3. The gallery is located on the 3rd floor of the IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, located at 565 West Adams Street in Chicago [the corner of Adams and Jefferson]. Street Parking is abundant.

The gallery hours are: Monday-Thursday 7:30am-11pm, Friday 7:30am-9:30pm, and Saturday 8:30am- 6pm. Most of the pieces included in the exhibition are available for purchase. Additional information can be found at BreakingCriminalTraditions.com.


Painter Lorraine Sack studied at the apprenticed based art school Atelier Lack in her native Minnesota. The school, with linage back to the Boston School of Art and 19th century French Academy, focused on the fine art of seeing nature truthfully. The four year program incorporated the French academy’s ideas of drawing and seeing values with the impressionist idea of seeing true versus formulaic color. In addition to her formal training, Lorraine studied the Old Masters and Impressionists in Italy, Germany and France. She also studied anatomy extensively to better understand the human form.

Currently Lorraine works out of her studio in Indianapolis, Indiana. Her work is represented by the G. C. Lucas Gallery, Indianapolis, Indiana. Gallery 180, Chicago, Illinois featured her latest solo exhibition in 2011. Her paintings have been juried into a number of museum shows and selected for several group exhibitions nationally and internationally.


Lorraine is the recipient of many awards including: The Butler Institute of American Art, Honorable Mention in The 73rd National Midyear, The Lexington Art League, Second Place in The Nude Annual Juried Exhibition, The Hoosier Salon, Outstanding Oil in the Hoosier Salon Annual Exhibition, The American Artist Magazine, Emerging Artist Achievement Award, The California Art Club, Honorable Mention, The Art Calendar, Web Site Publication in November of 1997, The Pastel Society of the West Coast, Specialty Award, The John F. & Anna Stacey Scholarship and the Frances Hook Scholarship Fund. 

Lorraine has been included in publications such as the American Artist Learning from Today’s Art Masters and The Artist’s Magazine. 

Collections including Lorraine’s work are Illinois Institute of Art - Chicago, Kinsey Institute Art Gallery in Bloomington, Indiana, Kizu Senior Living Community in Kyoto, Japan, Rosemount Inc. in Denmark, and RTW Corporation in Bloomington, Minnesota. 

Friday, October 25, 2013

Jane Fulton Alt: The Burn

 
Jane Fulton Alt, Burn 55

Award-winning Fine Art Photographer, Jane Fulton Alt will discuss her recently published book, The Burn, at the Book Release Party hosted by the DePaul Art Museum, on Thursday, November 7th from 6-8pm. The work captures the beauty and violence of controlled prairie burns. The photographs are a mystical journey into the place between life, death and rebirth. Fulton Alt explains:
While observing controlled prairie burns, I was drawn to the ephemeral quality of the moment when life and death are not contradictory but are perceived as a single process to be embraced as a whole.
The beginning of this project coincided with my sister’s diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer, more than four years ago. The parallels between the burn and chemotherapy were immediately revealed to me. Just as the burning reduces invasive vegetation that crowds out native plants, chemotherapy destroys unwanted growth, allowing for new healthy cells to establish themselves. These images were created and inspired with this deeper awareness and understanding of the life cycle.
The Burn, book release party will take place on Thursday, November 7th from 6-8pm—Fulton Alt will speak at 7pm—at the DePaul Art Museum located at 935 W. Fullerton Avenue, Chicago. Admission is complimentary. This event is presented in cooperation with The Ragdale Foundation and the DePaul Art Museum.

Jane Fulton Alt, a Chicago native, received her BA from the University of Michigan and MA from the University of Chicago. She studied art at the Evanston Art Center, Columbia College and the Art Institute of Chicago. Her work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, Smithsonian National Museum of American History, New Orleans Museum of Art, De Paul University Art Museum, Southwest Museum of Photography, Beinecke Library at Yale University, Centro Fotografico Alvarez Bravo in Oaxaca, Mexico, Center for Photography at Woodstock, Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, and the collection of William Hunt. Alt is the recipient of the 2007 Illinois Arts Council Fellowship Award, the 2007-2009, 2011 Ragdale Foundation Fellowships and winner of Critical Mass for her Katrina and Burn portfolios in 2007, 2009 and 2011. She has authored Look and Leave: Photographs and Stories of New Orleans’s Lower Ninth Ward and her Crude Awakening portfolio was been picked up by multiple publications worldwide. Most recently she received the Photo District News 2011 Curators Choice Award. Jane Fulton Alt is represented by the Corden Potts Gallery in San Francisco.

Monday, October 21, 2013

ArtScene at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art: Meditative Surfaces


Deanna Krueger, "Otekaike", Mixed Media, 54x72"

In just a few weeks, the Fort Wayne Museum of Art will be hosting "Meditative Surfaces"—a three-person exhibition comprised of work by Deanna Krueger, Maggie Meiners and myself. The exhibition will be presented in the Contemporary Regional Gallery from November 9 through January 19. Meditative Surfaces presents work created with both traditional and experimental techniques—yet all of the pieces explore unique personal content. The diversity of inspiration includes: X-Ray and MRI diagnostic imagery, mixed-media, self-analysis through photographic childhood contemplations and the prehistoric megaliths of Great Britain.

 
Maggie Meiners, "Slick" C-Print, 40x40"

On Friday, November 15th, Krueger, Meiners and myself will be in Fort Wayne to take part in the ArtScene lecture series. ArtScene is a dynamic program featuring living artists and curators discussing their work in contemporary life through diverse topics such as motivations, struggles, influences, life experiences, and artistic inspirations.

ArtScene: Meditative Surfaces will be presented on November 15 at 6:30pm. The event is free to FWMoA Members. There is a $5 fee for non-members.

The Fort Wayne Museum of Art is located in downtown Fort Wayne on Main Street next to the Arts United Center at the corner of Main and Lafayette. The Museum offers convenient parking behind the building, and is fully handicap accessible. The museum is open: Sunday, 12-5 pm, Tuesday-Saturday, 10 am - 6pm, and Thursday 10am-8 pm.


 
 Charles Gniech "Wave Watching" acrylic on canvas, 40x60"

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Born and raised in Michigan and currently living in Chicago, Deanna Krueger is an Instructor at Northeastern Illinois University, teaching courses in painting and design. Krueger holds a Master of Fine Art degree from Eastern Michigan University and a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of Michigan. She has been a Visiting Artist at various Colleges and Universities around the mid-west, including The University of Michigan, Portland College in Champaign, Illinois, and Robert Morris College in Chicago. Krueger’s work has been exhibited nationally as well as internationally with exhibits in Berlin and Rome. A Solo exhibition of Krueger’s work will be presented at Gallery 180 of The Illinois Institute of Art-Chicago, during the 2010 exhibition season.


Born in Chicago, IL, Maggie Meiners had a suburban upbringing, graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Cultural Anthropology from University of Colorado-Boulder, and a Master of Education degree from De Paul University in Chicago, Illinois. She now resides outside of Chicago. Although Meiners is primarily a self-taught photographer, she devours books on art and photography, has taken workshops with Diane Kittle, Lauren Henkin, and Norman Mauskopf, and relies on a number of mentors to help her hone her creative and photographic skills. Meiners tends to find interest in objects that most people would overlook… and presents those subjects in her photography. It doesn’t necessarily matter what the subject is, but whether or not it is open for interpretation. Her compositions are direct, to the point of appearing minimal, while her subject matter, conversely discloses significant complexity. Meiner’s work appears in numerous private and public collections, including: The Illinois Institute of Art, Harrison Street Lofts, and Wheaton College. Additionally, she has been the recipient of numerous awards and prizes, including the 2009 Ragdale Prize. Among other bodies of work, Meiners continues to produce pieces for her large scale “Childhood Contemplations” imagery. This abstract work—comprised of random color patterns—invites the viewer to enter into a meditative environment. This series was exhibited at Gallery 180 of The Illinois Institute of Art-Chicago, in September 2008 and is currently touring with the work of Deanna Krueger and Charles Gniech.

Born in Chicago, Illinois, Charles Gniech is a Professor of Art at The Illinois Institute of Art- Chicago. He holds a Master of Fine Art degree with an emphasis in painting and a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with an emphasis in illustration, both from Northern Illinois University. While teaching, curating, consulting and freelancing, Gniech continues to paint and exhibits at the national level. His paintings focus on the meditative qualities of the stone circles found throughout Great Britain. Having explored many megalithic sites over the past twenty years, Gniech embraces the peaceful serenity of the mystical structures—a serenity that is reflected in his work. Images of his paintings may be seen on the web site: gniech.com The paintings of Charles Gniech have been included into various gallery and museum exhibitions. His work has been exhibited at The Rockford Art Museum, The Fort Wayne Museum of Art, and The Quincy Art Center. Represented by ZIA Gallery [Winnetka, IL] and Gallery H [Three Oaks, MI], Gniech’s paintings have been acquired for numerous public and private collections.



Friday, October 18, 2013

Breaking Criminal Traditions ~ the opening reception


Richard Laurent
photo by: Deborah Adams Doering

Last Thursday's Opening Reception of the "Breaking Criminal Traditions" exhibition at IIT Chicago - Kent College of Law, was energizing. Many of the artists were on hand—discussing their work and the global issues that inspired the exhibition.

The exhibition's co-producer, Richard Laurent, spent the evening mingling with guests while conveying the importance of the issues at hand. Working in a variety of styles, Laurent's imagery subtlety explores the not-so-subtle topics of acid violence, female genital mutilation and forced child marriage, among others. The intensity of the subject matter is somewhat upstaged by the creative artistry of this modern master. The viewer is memorized by the aptitude of the techniques used to create these beautiful works of fine art.

The Art of influence: Breaking Criminal Traditions will be on display through February 3. The gallery is located on the 3rd floor of the IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, located at 565 West Adams Street in Chicago [the corner of Adams and Jefferson]. Street Parking is abundant.

The exhibition includes work by:  James Deeb, Sheila Ganch, Andrea Harris, Paula Kloczkowski Luberda, Richard Laurent, Zoriah Miller, Nancy Rosen, Lorraine Sack, Valerie Schiff, Barbara Simcoe, and Anne Smith Stephan

The gallery is open Monday-Thursday 7:30am-11pm, Friday 7:30am-9:30pm, and Saturday 8:30am- 6pm. Most of the pieces included in the exhibition are available for purchase. Additional information can be found at BreakingCriminalTraditions.com.

photo by: Deborah Adams Doering

Co-producer Richard Laurent is an award-winning painter who exhibits in galleries and shows nationwide. Oil Painters of America has honored him with the prestigious national Blick Prize and he is the recipient of numerous other awards as well. Laurent teaches throughout the Chicago area. 

Laurent has exhibited at the International Museum of Contemporary Masters of Fine Art and has shown his paintings at Oil Painters of America national exhibitions since 2004. In 2006, he was awarded the Dick Blick Prize by OPA. He mounted a solo show at the Fine Arts Building Gallery in Chicago under the title, "Heavy Petting-The Painted Animal" in 2004. That same year at the National "Animal in Art" Exhibition, juror Ed Paschke awarded his painting "Best of Show in Oil Media." He mounted another solo exhibition in 2006 at the Fine Arts Building Gallery entitled "Beauty & Beast." In May of that same year, in a visual essay exploring definitions of classical beauty, Artscope.net reviewed the exhibition. In 2008, his painting "Swimming" was purchased by The Illinois Institute of Art-Chicago for the school's permanent collection. He has also been a participant at two Chicago and Vicinity exhibitions at the Art Institute of Chicago.  
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Tuesday, October 8, 2013

Breaking Criminal Traditions ~ Installed


"Venus", a bronze sculpture by Valerie Schiff, welcomes patrons to
The Art of Influence: Breaking Criminal Traditions

The Art of Influence: Breaking Criminal Traditions was installed this past weekend. The exhibition—including both two-and-three dimensional works—opened yesterday for preview. The public Opening Reception will be held on Thursday, October 10th from 5:15-8:15. The exhibition is presented in the 3rd floor gallery of IIT Chicago - Kent College of Law, located at 565 West Adams Street, in Chicago.

Already receiving enthusiastic reviews, "Breaking Criminal Traditions" was compiled to raise awareness of global criminal traditions... traditions that continue today. The pieces included, were selected to elude to the issues without being overtly obvious. The content of the show walks a blurred line between the horrifying reality of the world in which we live—and the intense beauty of empowerment and freedom.

Patrons who explored the show during previews, defined the work as inspirational and empowering. One viewer was even moved to tears.

Left: Paula Kloczkowski Luberda, "Connected", Stoneware, 12" diameter
Right: Zoriah Miller, "The Weapons Cache, Archival Photograph 1/8, 24 x 24"

The exhibiting artists are: James Deeb (Evanston, IL), Sheila Ganch (Chicago, IL), Andrea Harris (Chicago, IL), Paula Kloczkowski Luberda (Naperville, IL), Richard Laurent (Chicago, IL), Zoriah Miller (New York, NY, Paris, France), Nancy Rosen (Chicago, IL), Lorraine Sack (Indianapolis, IN), Valerie Schiff (Chicago, IL), Barbara Simcoe (Omaha, NE), and Anne Smith Stephan (Wilmette, IL)

The Art of influence: Breaking Criminal Traditions will be on display through February 3. A public Opening Reception will take place on Thursday, October10 from 5:15-8:15pm. The gallery is located on the 3rd floor of the IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, located at 565 West Adams Street in Chicago [the corner of Adams and Jefferson]. Street Parking is abundant and there are a number of lots within a single block.

The gallery is open Monday-Thursday 7:30am-11pm, Friday 7:30am-9:30pm, and Saturday 8:30am- 6pm. Most of the pieces included in the exhibition are available for purchase. Additional information can be found at BreakingCriminalTraditions.com.


Valerie Schiff has studied with a variety of talented teachers including: Lynn Borst, Alan Gavin, Richard Halsted, and Gay Riseborough. Seeking to learn more about human anatomy, Valerie was fortunate to study with Sheila Oettinger. Working with Oettinger helped her to work larger and to subtly infuse power and emotion into her sculpture. Schiff’s accolades include numerous awards including multiple "Best in Show" prizes.

Paula Kloczkowski Luberda
is an established and widely exhibited artist. Her work has been presented in regional, national and international exhibitions for more than two decades. Her extensive award list includes: A Purchase Award from The Illinois Institute of Art-Chicago, A Merit Award from Salisbury State University; Best of Show from Nicolet College, Wisconsin; 3rd Place Indiana University; Merit Award Quincy Art Center; Honorable Mention from Rockford Art Museum, and an Award of Excellence from the Norris Cultural Center of St. Charles. Paula Kloczkowski Luberda—and her work—has been featured in the Chicago Tribune, the Chicago Sun Times and the Daily Herald News Paper, as well as other print media. Her work was also featured on NBC Channel 5 news. Luberda’s education includes a BA in Studio Art, an Associate’s degree in Design and Illustration, specialized instruction in ceramic sculpture from the Art Institute of Chicago, fiber sculpture from Concordia University, Montreal Canada, Mold making from San Antonio Institute of Art, San Antonio, Texas, and Patination at Cleveland University, Cleveland Ohio.

Zoriah Miller
is a world renowned photojournalist known for his prolific work documenting conflict, crisis and disasters. His award winning photography has appeared in major motion pictures, on television, book covers and in publications such as The New York Times, Rolling Stone, Newsweek, Elle, The Wall Street Journal, Cosmopolitan and countless others. His work is exhibited around the world and permanently archived in the United States Library of Congress.


Sunday, September 15, 2013

the art of influence... Breaking Criminal Traditions

 
 Richard Laurent, "Small Change", oil on canvas, 36 x 36"

Save the Date:
Reception: Thursday, October 10,  5:15-8:15pm

IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, Gallery
3rd floor, 565 West Adams Street, Chicago

The Art of Influence: Breaking Criminal Traditions is an exhibition that calls attention to ongoing ancient rituals that kill or maim millions each year—yet aren’t considered crimes. This approachable yet provocative fine art exhibition debuts at the IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, with an opening reception for the public on Thursday, October 10 from 5:15 to 8:15 PM.

I curated the exhibition, which features 38 pieces of fine art—in a variety of mediums—representing several prominent artists. The pieces selected for this exhibition are intriguing—with many levels of interpretation. Conscious of the human rights issues outlined by Executive Producer, Cheryl Jefferson, I selected beautiful imagery that contains multiple levels of meaning. Most of the pieces were not created specifically for this show, yet they were chosen because the content alludes to the issues at hand. Each piece has its own voice but the viewer will bring their own interpretation.

The Art of influence: Breaking Criminal Traditions is a visual exploration of human rights. The exhibition is designed to begin a dialogue and raise consciousness, which is the first step toward preventing the continuation of these horrifying acts.

The exhibition includes fine art by: James Deeb (Evanston, IL), Sheila Ganch (Chicago, IL), Andrea Harris (Chicago, IL), Paula Kloczkowski Luberda (Naperville, IL), Richard Laurent (Chicago, IL), Zoriah Miller (New York, NY, Paris, France), Nancy Rosen (Chicago, IL), Lorraine Sack (Indianapolis, IN), Valerie Schiff (Chicago, IL), Barbara Simcoe (Omaha, NE), and Anne Smith Stephan (Wilmette, IL)

The Art of influence: Breaking Criminal Traditions will be on display through February 3. Previews begin on October 7th. A public Opening Reception will take place on Thursday, October10 from 5:15-8:15pm. The gallery is located on the 3rd floor of the IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, located at 565 West Adams Street in Chicago [the corner of Adams and Jefferson]. The gallery is open Monday-Thursday 7:30am-11pm, Friday 7:30am-9:30pm, and Saturday 8:30am- 6pm. Most of the pieces included in the exhibition are available for purchase. Additional information can be found at BreakingCriminalTraditions.com.



Co-producer Richard Laurent is an award-winning painter who exhibits in galleries and shows nationwide. Oil Painters of America has honored him with the prestigious national Blick Prize and he is the recipient of numerous other awards as well. Laurent teaches throughout the Chicago area.

Laurent grew up in the West, in Denver, Colorado. He came to Chicago to study printmaking with Misch Cohn at the Institute of Design/IIT and began his career as a designer. As an art director of animated films and magazines as well as an editorial illustrator and cartoonist, Laurent had a realization that his future lay in the fine arts. Intense self-study followed, eventually leading him to some of the major art museums in the world.

Laurent has exhibited at the International Museum of Contemporary Masters of Fine Art and has shown his paintings at Oil Painters of America national exhibitions since 2004. In 2006, he was awarded the Dick Blick Prize by OPA. He mounted a solo show at the Fine Arts Building Gallery in Chicago under the title, "Heavy Petting-The Painted Animal" in 2004. That same year at the National "Animal in Art" Exhibition, juror Ed Paschke awarded his painting "Best of Show in Oil Media." He mounted another solo exhibition in 2006 at the Fine Arts Building Gallery entitled "Beauty & Beast." In May of that same year, in a visual essay exploring definitions of classical beauty, Artscope.net reviewed the exhibition. In 2008, his painting "Swimming" was purchased by The Illinois Institute of Art-Chicago for the school's permanent collection. He has also been a participant at two Chicago and Vicinity exhibitions at the Art Institute of Chicago.

Laurent's drawings and paintings are included in two monographs: Contemporary American Drawing and Contemporary American Painting, published by Jilin Fine Art, He was also included in an article on Oil Painters of America in American Art Collector (May, 2009). Laurent's oil paintings have also been shown in various juried and invitational gallery shows around the country, including NYC and Scottsdale, AZ. When he isn't painting in the studio, Laurent teaches in the Art + Design Department at Columbia College.

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Monday, August 12, 2013

Susan Sensemann at Perimeter Gallery

Susan Sensemann "Disclosing the Verge" 2013, Acrylic and ink on wood, 24" x 24"

If you are in the neighborhood of Chicago's River North Gallery District, stop by the Perimeter Gallery for the summer show. On view in the lower level are works by Clark Ellithorpe, Neville Gerson, Judith Kruger, and Susan Sensemann.

I dropped by the gallery last week and found myself captivated by the imagery of artist, Susan Sensemann.  Her rich patterns fill and manipulate space, offering the viewer a multitude of avenues to explore. I  found myself lost in the beauty of her surface patterns—eventually moving to the next canvas—Then the third and eventually left wanting more. Two 48" square canvases [not shown here] share a single wall. The pieces are meditatively-stunning—especially at the larger format. This show is a must see!

The Summer Group Show at Perimeter runs through August 30th. Perimeter Gallery is located at 210 W. Superior Street in Chicago.

Susan Sensemann is an artist, educator, and arts administrator who has lived and worked in Chicago since 1979. She is Professor Emerita at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Sensemann has curated a number of exhibitions that reveal her interests in feminism, gothicism, eroticism and contemporary baroque. Her photographs and paintings have been exhibited nationally and internationally, and are held in numerous private, public and university collections.
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Tuesday, July 30, 2013

...Breaking Criminal Traditions


Barbara Simcoe, "She Shall be Repaid", oil on wood panel 9 x 14

"The Art of Influence: Breaking Criminal Traditions" is an exhibition that was created to raise awareness of the global atrocities that have become traditions in various cultures. The exhibition is meant to begin a dialogue, which will lead to additional dialogue between the US and citizens of effected nations—supporting those citizens as they work for the cultural change that can only come from within.

The exhibition will open at the IIT-Chicago, Kent College of Law on October 10th. The gallery will present work by James Deeb, Sheila Ganch, Andrea Harris, Paula Kloczkowski Luberda, Richard Laurent, Zoriah Miller, Nancy Rosen, Lorraine Sack, Valerie Schiff, Barbara Simcoe, and Ann Smith Stephan. The imagery presented ranges from photo realism to abstraction but all works relate directly or conceptually to the issue at hand.

Author, Cheryl Jefferson is the driving force behind the exhibition. Her knowledge of Criminal Traditions has allowed her to speak at the UN and present a TEDTalk. Jefferson's passion is obvious...  and the injustice perverse. She explains:
Worldwide women live too close to their bones and too far from their dreams, the victims of criminal traditions. Criminal traditions are ongoing, centuries old rituals that kill or maim millions each year yet aren't considered crimes. They include honor killing, acid attacks, bride burning, forced childhood marriage, female genital mutilation and other violence that is not illegal because the perpetrators are relatives who are doing "what's best" for the girl or "defending" their family's honor.
"The Art of Influence: Breaking Criminal Traditions" will run through February 6th. Many receptions are planned. I will be blogging about them in future posts. Additional information will also be available at BreakingCriminalTraditions. com

Barbara Simcoe has been a working artist for more than thirty years. Her formal art training was at the University of Illinois, Urbana and the University of North Texas, Denton. She lived and worked in Dallas 16 years where she was very involved in the art community and in exhibiting her work. Currently residing in Omaha, NE she is a Professor on the faculty of Art and Art History at the University of Nebraska and has taught painting and drawing since 1998. Barbara has shown widely in nationally and in European venues in many invitational and juried exhibitions. She has had numerous one person exhibitions, awards and grants, in 2004 she received a Fulbright Grant for which she lived, taught and made artwork in Lithuania. She traveled to Israel summer 2005 to participate in an international exhibition in the city of Akko. Academic year 2006-07 she was on sabbatical, the focus of which was working in the studio and a trip to Poland where she had a solo exhibition of her digital photos at the Albert Gallery in Krakow. Most recently she had a one person exhibition in the Czech Republic for which she showed digital photo collages influenced by a trip to France summer 2008. Barbara’s work consists of oil paintings, graphite and ink drawings and digital photography. Stylistically she works with realistic figuration inhabiting psychological and symbolic spaces. Her website may be found at barbarasimcoe.com.

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Saturday, July 20, 2013

Charles Gniech ~ Callanish at ZIA Gallery


Charles Gniech, “Callanish 9808”, Color Photograph, 1/1, 19.5”x12.75” 1998

First exhibited in 1998 at Kavi Gupta’s "Vedanta" Gallery, "Callanish 9808" was presented in a solo show titled "Sanctuary". At that point in my career, I was focused on the physical qualities of the prehistoric sites found throughout the United Kingdom. The Sanctuary exhibition mixed the photographic documentation of various sites, and rock surface details, with painted geometric abstract interpretations of the sites. Some of the photographic surface details were the genesis of my current paintings.

In 1998, after flying from Chicago to London, I hopped a train north to Inverness… a bus to Uilapool… and then a ferry to the little town of Stornoway on the Isle of Lewis. Stornoway is a little harbor town seemingly two blocks long and two blocks wide. As the ferry approached, I could see an old castle on the hill behind the harbor. I arrived with no accommodations. Back then I enjoyed living in the moment… “showing up” and allowing destiny to intervene. I still try to live my life like this but I’ve found that it becomes more difficult with age and responsibilities. I never ended up sleeping on the street, but I did come close, just once. I always seemed to be taken care of… always having what was needed; a warm bed, food, or an interesting conversation. I’m currently in the process of compiling the stories of my experiences, and of the people I encountered through my exploration of the megalithic structures, traveling throughout the UK. I’m sure segments of these stories will end up in future posts.

In any case… Two original color photographs—Callanish 9808, and Callinash 9809—will be available through ZIA Gallery in Winnetka. The two prints are one-of-a-kind… with my signature hidden under the mat. The upcoming “750 show” will include work from a variety of the gallery artists as well as that of some invited artists. All works—very affordable—under $750… hence the name.

ZIA Gallery is located at 548 Chestnut in Winnetka, Illinois... 17 miles north of Chicago. The gallery is open Monday through Saturday from 10:00am–5:00pm. The opening reception for the 750 show is Saturday, July 27, 4:00–7:00pm. Stop by and check it out.
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Saturday, July 13, 2013

Meditative Surfaces ~ Fort Wayne Museum of Art


Charles Gniech, Watching Waves, acrylic on canvas, 36" x 60"

This fall, the Fort Wayne Museum of Art will be presenting the three-person exhibition titled "Meditative Surfaces". Meditative Surfaces is a powerfully inspirational exhibition focusing on meditative surface patterns. The exhibition brings together the work of Mixed-media Artist; Deanna Krueger, Photographer; Maggie Meiners and my surface paintings. All of the included work was inspired by our own—very different—individual passions, yet the work comes together to present a united statement of introspection.

I've spent more then a two decades exploring the serene qualities of the prehistoric stone circles that are found throughout Great Britain. Most people are familiar with Stonehenge, yet there are areas concentrated with megalithic structures as far to the north as the Scottish Islands, and as far to the south-and west-as Cornwall. The largest complex of circles is just to the north of Stonehenge, at Avebury.

I am inspired by the patterns found on the massive prehistoric megaliths. I reference and manipulate these patterns to create tranquil imagery. My latest body of work is influenced by the meditative qualities of the fluid surface patterns found on these monuments. I have taken some artistic liberties, in the replication, manipulation and abstraction of the surface patterns found on these massive stone slabs, yet the work continues to convey the serene qualities regularly associated with nature and inner peace.

The two other artists presented in this exhibition are Mixed Media Artist, Deanna Krueger and Fine Art Photographer, Maggie Meiners.
 
Deanna Krueger produces powerful mixed media forms created from recycled medical diagnostic film layered with monotypes. The film is torn, repositioned, and then stapled together to create various multi-faceted surfaces. The semi-reflective surfaces create a mesmerizing, gem-like quality. Krueger’s given titles hint at the conceptual nuances, which imply humanity’s collective search for meaning. Krueger explains:
“I am interested in humanity's collective search for meaning in the absurdity that is this life, and in the pleasure to be found in the various manifestations of that search.”

“…Serving as a marker of this time of transition, the materials speak to the recent evolution of information storage. When virtual documents replace paper, the lowly staple will become an artifact of an earlier information age. Modes of diagnostic imagery are shifting as well: X-Rays and MRI scans are increasingly being recorded solely in the digital realm.”
The large-scale abstract photographs of Maggie Meiners come from her “Childhood Contemplations” series. The mere size of these forty-inch square digital c-prints, allows the viewer to become engulfed by the imagery and to explore their inner mind. The various color patterns are meant to trigger memories on which to contemplate. In defining this body of work, Meiners explains:
“Although the use of blurred imagery seems to defy logic, this intentional shift in focus is meant to transfix and then transport the viewer to a mind space where memories run wild. Various spectrums of color are used as a guide to revisit and explore memories of the past.”
"Meditative Surfaces" will be exhibited at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art from November 13 through January 14th with a panel discussion scheduled for Friday, November 15th. More on that in future posts.
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Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Roland Kulla opens this Saturday at ZIA Gallery



Roland Kulla will be presenting a new series of paintings and drawings featuring railroad bridges at ZIA Gallery in Winnetka. The exhibition opens this Saturday evening with a reception from 5-7PM.

I stopped by the gallery yesterday and the works had just been delivered. I had the opportunity to preview the show and the pieces are obsessively amazing! If you're free on Saturday evening, take a ride up to Winnetka to see the show. It will be worth the trip. After the show, check out Jerry's for dinner. It's a block south of ZIA Gallery and the food is wonderful!

ZIA Gallery is located at 548 Chestnut St., Winnetka, IL 6009. Parking is free and abundant.

847.446.3970 • ZIAgallery.net
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Thursday, May 23, 2013

Roland Kulla ~ ZIA Gallery


St. Charles Air Line, 2013, acrylic on canvas, 60” x 40”

Save the Date: Saturday June 8, 5-7pm

For the past twelve years, Chicago painter Roland Kulla, has focused his attention on the complex structures of bridges. With an obsession for detail, his work has evolved from hyper real imagery depicting idealized nuts and bolts to the current exhibition of hyper real and gritty functional railroad bridges.

Roland Kulla began his career as a fine artist in the late 90’s after more than thirty years as a caseworker, administrator, researcher, teacher and consultant. His early paintings focused on the heightened reality of the mundane—causing the viewer to take a second look at an object that would typically go unnoticed.

 Fast Slow, 2003, oil on canvas, 36" x 40"

In 2003, the paintings progressed to consider the element of “rust”… the slow rot of the massive bridges. Time became a visual element within the work. Kulla utilized environment, blurred backgrounds, and the decay of previously hard edge metal forms. He defined the rust images as metaphor for his personal aging process as well as  making reference to the politics of the period.

By 2005, Kulla was working on a series of paintings that focused on tightly cropped bridge details with no true up or down. Most of the “Deco” images were produced so that they could be hung to the owner’s liking.

After 2005, Kulla began to explore bridge cities beyond Chicago. In 2006 he produced a series based on the bridges of Boston, 2007; New York, and 2008; Pittsburgh. By 2010 he created “Urban Patterns” an exhibition of paintings focusing on the bridges of New York and New Jersey. And by 2011; Berlin was the subject.

Tegeler II, 2011, acrylic on canvas, 60" x 45"

Roland Kulla's new body of work begins an exploration of railroad bridges. Kulla explains:
“…In contrast to transportation bridges—where civic pride usually requires elements of conventional architectural beauty—the railroad bridge is all about function. It has to be strong enough to carry the heavy weight of loaded trains. Movable railroad bridges add another layer of complexity. This focus on solving a problem with maximum efficiency results in some amazing forms. They do not need to look pretty; they just need to get the job done.”
RR: New works featuring railroad bridges by Roland Kulla will be presented at ZIA Gallery from June 8 through July 20, with and opening reception on Saturday, June 8th from 5-7pm. ZIA Gallery is located at 548 Chestnut St., Winnetka, IL 6009. Parking is free and abundant.

847.446.3970 • ZIAgallery.net

Thursday, May 16, 2013

Don Pollack ~ Perimeter Gallery


Don Pollack, Detail from "American Landscape" 2012
oil on panel, 7 panels each 9 x 7 inches

“34 Days to Washington” is the current exhibition by artist, Don Pollack, on view at Perimeter Gallery in Chicago. It’s an interesting exhibit that chronicles a recent 2046 mile bicycle journey that followed Abraham Lincoln’s inaugural train route from Springfield to Washington D.C. The exhibition consists of paintings, maps and significant objects that compare and contrast the parallel expeditions. From Pollack’s statement…
I propose that the time has come to recognize the human powered act of riding a bicycle as an artistic gesture. The form is about movement and the measure of place. Slow movement and long distance travel situates a rider in an intimate relationship within the landscape…
Pollack goes on to describe his touring speed in relation to that of a horse and buggy… offering a slower, simpler transition of the scenic countryside. He attempts to mimic the same perception that Lincoln would have experienced on his journey. The images are peaceful but not typical of landscape painting. He incorporates graphic elements to his imagery and offers interesting twists to the landscape theme.

Continuing through May 31st, this exhibition is well worth exploring. Perimeter Gallery is located at 210 W. Superior Street in Chicago. The gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10:30 to 5:30.


Rhonda Gates, "Steeling Blue Away", 2011, oil on panel, 16" x 20

While you’re there, check out the lower level gallery. There is an exhibition of abstract modular paintings by Rhonda Gates that’s also quite wonderful.
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Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Carl Holzman ~ Gallery H



Carl Holzman, "Gallos Rojas" oil on canvas, 30 x 30"

Now that the weather is getting warmer, it's time for Chicago's elite to make their way up to Michigan to open their beach homes for the summer. Just across the Indiana / Michigan border, on Lake Michigan, is Harbor Country. Just inland, there is a wonderful little town called Three Oaks… And as you make your way through the center of town, you will find a beautiful Chicago-caliber gallery; Gallery H.

Nancy Hoffman opened Gallery H some seven-or-eight years ago, presenting a variety of contemporary works ranging from abstraction to hyperrealism… from paintings and sculpture to mixed media and photography. Hoffman continues to represent many of the artists she began with, but she’s always searching for new and amazing works of fine art.

This year, Gallery H opens its season with the paintings of Carl Holzman. Holzman—a truly gifted artist—creates beautiful still life imagery using antiques as subject matter. His muted use of color tones and modulation of light and dark are intriguingly intoxicating—luring the viewer into the picture plane and offering an opportunity to explore the past with a new perspective. The pieces are enticing. If you have the opportunity to make in up to Harbor Country in the next few weeks, you should consider a side trip to Gallery H to experience Holzman’s work.

Gallery H is located in at 15 South Elm Street in Three Oaks, Michigan. Gallery hours are: Fridays 12pm-5pm / Saturdays 12pm - 6pm EST / Sundays 12pm - 5pm EST



Monday, May 13, 2013

Ginny Mangrum ~ Selections from the Collection


"Subway", digitally enhanced photograph from film, edition of 15, 16 x 20", 2009

Included in the current exhibition—"Selections from the Collection" at Gallery 180 of The Illinois Institute of Art-Chicago—is a digitally enhanced photograph from film by Ginny Mangrum, titled "Subway". The moody, high contrast image was purchased from the "photo '11" exhibition, for inclusion into the School's permanent Fine Art Collection. Mangrum's work from this series eliminates references to society, inviting the viewer into an unsettling environment. Mangrum explains...
“Subway”, is an image from the “Night Moves II” series. This series of black and white, digitally enhanced film photographs, examines the psychological associations existing within private and public places photographed without people. These voyeuristic observations are shot at night to emphasize an unsettling tension. Elements are isolated from surrounding activities, containing them within a portal and framed by a large darkened canvas. Because signage and identifying information has intentionally been eliminated, the image delineates the vulnerability of the space, and infuses it with suspense—waiting for something to happen.
"Subway" is just one of fifteen pieces selected to be exhibited in the final exhibition at Gallery 180 of The Illinois Institute of Art-Chicago. The exhibition is scheduled to continue through July 8th. Most of the collection can be viewed at gallery180.com

Gallery 180 is located at 180 N. Wabash—at the corner of Lake and Wabash—in Chicago’s Loop. The gallery is open Monday through Thursday from 8am-8pm, Friday 8am-5:30pm and Saturday 9am-5pm. Admission is free.

 

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Selections from the Collection ~ Gallery 180


Julia DelNagro Oehmke, "Back View" oil, 24"x18"

This past weekend, I installed my final exhibition at Gallery 180 of The Illinois Institute of Art-Chicago. The exhibition consists of work that has been shown and collected by the school, over the past decade. Fifteen pieces, make up the exhibition that tends to focus more on thought-provoking perception than literal subject. This is evident even within the figurative imagery included in the exhibition.

There are six pieces in the exhibition that use the figure as subject—some more obviously than others—but each conveys a message beyond the obvious.

Shown above, “Back View” by Julia DelNagro Oehmke, presents a beautifully painted semi-nude figure, abstracted through style and composition. The form is revealed through harsh lighting with deep shadows exaggerating a restricted pose that conceals the extremities. The tightly confined torso mimics the tension found in the subtle ripple of flesh in the lower back, the draped fabric grasping at the hips, and the tightly pulled hair. The image defines restriction and confinement… It’s not simply a painting of a beautiful woman.

Two photographs by Maggie Meiners are included in the exhibition. The figurative piece of the two—“Joe”—was acquired during the national juried exhibition titled “Photo 11”. The image presents the portrait of a shy—and heavily jeweled, bearded man—exposing only a collection of rings and a quiet smile. The repetition of the subject’s fingers, comprise a complex pattern of horizontal lines, interrupted by an occasional trinket of metal, a highlight on skin or an unusually bright fingernail. The photograph—a portrait—is something more than just a portrait. It’s a composition defined by line, form, contrast, and repetition.


Maggie Meiners, "Joe", Silver Gelatine Print

“Family Circles”, an oil painting by Janet Doroba, features flat roughly modulated shapes of color to define the human form. The blurred, faceless figures—mostly turned away from the viewer—create an image reminiscent of a distant memory or dream. The vague depictions offer an opportunity for the viewer to explore personal relationships as well as the relationships of color combinations. The complementary color palette utilizes orange and blue to intensify the perceived color of each… perhaps referencing the intensity of family relationships.

Janet Doroba, "Family Circles" oil, 28"x22"

“From the Top Looking Down” by painter/sculptor/conceptual artist, Paula Kloczkowski Luberda is one of the larger pieces in the exhibition. The 48”-square, mixed media on wood image defines success …or perhaps failure. As in corporate America today, humanity is minimized. Each figure stands—or peeks over—the edge to evaluate their own success, unaware of the figures above and behind. The viewer seems to have the ultimate view.

Paula Kloczkowski Luberda, "From the Top Looking Down" mixed media on wood, 48"x48"

Michael Jankowski has two pieces in this exhibition that abstractly utilize the human form. With an aggressive drawing style displayed in “Letting Go”, Jankowski forcefully applies charcoal to paper and then gently erases into the surface to revile the likeness to the human form. The aggressive marks—seemingly referring to the chaos of life—are contrasted by a ghostly representation of skeletal remains. The image seems to represent the release of anxiety after leaving the physical form.

Jankowski’s second piece from the collection is titled “Untitled: He’s Number 8”. With a lighter, more delicate touch, this image subtly emerges from the page to invite the viewer into an environment of treasures. Diagonal lines mimic the aggressive marks of “Letting Go” but this quieter technique is less startling. With the implication of a figure buried within layers of random objects, Jankowski seems to be referencing the multitude of “things” that we collect and use to identify our selves. The quiet elegance seems to have a darker message… perhaps it’s an observation of the objects cluttering our personal environments. 

Michael Jankowski, "Letting Go", charcoal on paper, 1997, 25.25"x19.25"

Michael Jankowski, "Untitled: He's Number 8", charcoal on paper, 2000, 24"x18" 

All of the pieces in this exhibition have many layers of content. The images may be enjoyed for their obvious beauty but if you look a little further, deeper meanings will emerge.

The exhibition includes the work of: Janet Doroba, Gary Gordon, Jennifer Jackson, Michael Jankowski, Joe Killiea, Paula Kloczkowski Luberda, Roland Kulla, Diane Kunzler, Ginny Mangrum, Maggie Meiners, Julia DelNagro Oehmke, and RK Williams. I will be writing about other presented work in the coming weeks.

The “Selections from the Collection” exhibition will continue through July 8th. Gallery 180 is located at 180 N. Wabash—at the corner of Lake and Wabash—in Chicago’s Loop. The gallery is open Monday through Thursday from 8am-8pm, Friday 8am-5:30pm and Saturday 9am-5pm.
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Thursday, May 2, 2013

Final Exhibition at Gallery 180


Maggie Meiners, Flow" Silver Gelatin Print, 2004, 15"x15"
 
After more then eleven years as Exhibition Curator of the various galleries associated with The Illinois Institute of Art-Chicago, I will be stepping away to focus on other opportunities.

As the Michael Van Zeyl / Paula Kloczkowski Luberda exhibition closes, a show featuring select pieces from the school's fine art collection will be installed. These are among the works that have been acquired from exhibitions over the past decade. The Illinois Institute of Art-Chicago has been a strong supporter of the fine art community—acquiring work created by local and nationally recognized artists. These pieces are regularly exhibited throughout the common areas of the college but will come together in Gallery 180 for ease in public viewing.

Included in the exhibition is "Flow" by Chicago area fine art photographer, Maggie Meiners. Her abstract works are strong statements of pattern, surface and texture. Composed in a masterly fashion, the works revile the subject when viewed with more than just a glance.
Mieners' elaborates: 
I am drawn to abstract photography because I have complete control over what it is I am trying to capture, nothing is by accident. I like to see form and art in something most people would not, and bring it to light in a photograph. It doesn’t necessarily matter what the subject is, but whether or not it is open for interpretation. I strive to give new information and provide the viewer with insight into a quality that they cannot ordinarily experience. 
"Flow" is just one of the pieces which will be included in the final professional exhibition at Gallery 180 of The Illinois Institute of Art-Chicago. The school's Fine Art Collection can be viewed at gallery 180.com

Gallery 180 is located at 180 N. Wabash—at the corner of Lake and Wabash—in Chicago’s Loop. The gallery is open Monday through Thursday from 8am-8pm, Friday 8am-5:30pm and Saturday 9am-5pm. Additional information can be found at gallery180.com.
 
In following with the corporate model, future exhibitions within the gallery will present student and faculty work, which will be selected and installed by committee.
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Monday, April 29, 2013

Paula Kloczkowski Luberda and Michael Van Zeyl: Final Week at Gallery 180


Paula Kloczkowski Luberda
left: "duo" 18.5h x 5.5"d, Stoneware
right: "spiral" 17"h x 1 ¾"dia. Stoneware

This is the final week to visit the Paula Kloczkowski Luberda and Michael Van Zeyl exhibition at Gallery 180 of The Illinois Institute of Art-Chicago. The exhibition features Kloczkowski Luberda's coil built, abstract stoneware vessels along side of the figurative and still life paintings of Van Zeyl.

The abstract stoneware vessels created by Kloczkowski Luberda address the material source as concept itself—exposing and embracing the subtle flaws of the medium. Not mass-produced by machine, the subtle imperfections make reference to our own humanity... expressing strength, power as well as vulnerability.

The classical imagery of Michael Van Zeyl explores the human form as well as traditional still life. The subjects are rendered within a painterly atmosphere—where light defines form—to create compositions of classic mastery.

Michael Van Zeyl, Anna 10” x 8” Oil on Panel

The work of Michael Van Zeyl and Paula Kloczkowski Luberda will be presented at Gallery 180 of The Illinois Institute of Art-Chicago through May 2, 2013. All works are available for purchase. Gallery 180 is located at 180 N. Wabash—at the corner of Lake and Wabash—in Chicago’s Loop. The gallery is open Monday through Thursday from 8am-8pm, Friday 8am-5:30pm and Saturday 9am-5pm. Additional information can be found at gallery180.com

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Sheila Ganch ~ One of the Chicago Six



For sculptor Sheila Ganch, Chicago resonates in its people, a pair of them bent over a table in thought, sorting through their relationship with one another: their synergy, their diversity, their geography, their city.
— From the Chicago Art Source Press Release.


On April 4th, I missed the opening reception of “Chicago Six” at Chicago Art Source... I was "stranded" at a swimming pool in South Florida. I returned to Chicago early that evening—very tan—but too tired to attend a reception. A few days later, I made it over to the Chicago Art Source gallery, to explore the exhibition. I found that the "Chicago Six" are: Lynn Basa, Sheila Ganch, Michelle Gordon, Eric Holubow, Kristen Komar, and Mark Philips.

The show is defined by geography. Those included are Chicago Artists—the only constant in the exhibition. The show presents a range of very approachable imagery created through a wide variety of media. There is something for everyone. Consisting of mostly two dimensional work, the stand out pieces are the earthy figurative sculptures of Sheila Ganch. Her ceramic materials are sculpted, textured, and pigmented, to produce thought-provoking and inspirational images of humanity. The beautifully created abstractions work well along side the abstract oils of Michelle Gordon and the safer encaustic imagery of Lynn Basa. It's worth taking a few minutes to stop in and explore the exhibition. The show provides an  opportunity to make multiple purchases.


Michelle Gordon, Ghost, 40 x 40" Oil on Canvas

“Chicago Six” continues through June 22. Chicago Art Source is located at 1871 N. Clybourn in Chicago. The gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10-6 and Saturday 10-5. Free parking is available across the street.


Sheila Ganch received her degree from Ohio State University, but considers her postgraduate training with other fine sculptors to be the reason for her success. Her work has been exhibited at the Bellevue Washington City Sculpture Show, The Fort Wayne Museum of Art; Fort Wayne, IN, The Chicago Cultural Center, The Illinois Institute of Art-Chicago, The Harold Washington Library; Chicago and Veridian Gallery; New York. Ganch is currently represented by Gallery H; Three Oaks, Michigan, and The Chicago Art Source Gallery; Chicago.
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